Matthew, Julianne, and Daniel J., Irmo, SC

The Straight Up – August 2016

Posted on August 9, 2016 by Dr. Leslie Pitner.

  A Word From Dr. Katie Dr. Leslie called me about a year ago, telling me about her plan to open an adult orthodontic office, bringing the number of Pitner offices up to three. A crazy work load for sure, but if anyone could handle the task, it would be Leslie. Lucky for me, she Read More

The Straight Up – June 2016 edition

Posted on June 15, 2016 by Dr. Leslie Pitner.

  Keeping it in the family Many of you probably already know, but in case you didn’t realize it, Pitner Orthodontics is my family’s business. My dad started the practice in 1973, and I took over several years ago. I still remember my dad’s first office in a rental space on Broad River Road. The Read More

“You’ll find that life is still worthwhile if you just smile”: The Science Behind Your Smile Part 6

Posted on February 9, 2016 by Dr. Leslie Pitner. Tagged: , ,

Can just smiling make you happy? What if smiling, if even you weren’t happy, could make you feel better?  For psychologists, this is called the “facial feedback” hypothesis [1].  To test whether smiling can make you feel happier, researchers conducted an experiment where the participants were asked to hold a pencil in their mouths while Read More

Does Smiling Create Happiness? – The Science Behind Your Smile Part 5

Posted on January 26, 2016 by Dr. Leslie Pitner.

“Sometimes your joy is the source of your smile, but sometimes your smile can be the source of your joy.”  – Thich Nhat Hanh If an authentic (Duchenne) smile is caused by feeling happiness and joy, can smiling alone create these same good emotions in the brain? Paul Ekman joined with Richard Davidson, one of the world’s experts Read More

The Science Behind Your Smile, Part 2: A Smile is Universal

Posted on January 5, 2016 by Dr. Leslie Pitner. Tagged: ,

So when you break it down to its basic elements, what is a smile? In technical terms, a smile is caused by the firing of cranial nerve VII which then activates the zygomaticus major (cheek raising) and orbicularis oculi (eye crinkling) muscles. There are different types of smiles, each representing different points on the emotional Read More

How Praise Can Go Wrong

Posted on August 3, 2015 by Dr. Leslie Pitner.

Praising others seems like a practice it would be difficult to get wrong. You tell another person something nice, they (usually) feel good, and that’s it, right? But psychologist Dr. Carol Dweck has shown it is possible to give praise in the wrong way. She has done fascinating research on how praise can influence the Read More